Reply To Robert Morey’s Moon-God Allah Myth: A Look At The Archaeological Evidence

Reply To Robert Morey’s Moon-God Allah Myth: A Look At The Archaeological Evidence

M S M Saifullah, Mohd Elfie Nieshaem Juferi & ‘Abdullah David

© Islamic Awareness, All Rights Reserved.

First Composed: 13th April 2006

Last Modified: 15th September 2007

 


And from among His Signs are the night and the day, and the sun and the moon. Prostrate not to the sun nor to the moon, but prostrate to Allah Who created them, if you (really) worship Him. (Qur’an 41:37)

1. Introduction

One of the favourite arguments of the Christian missionaries over many years had been that Allah of the Qur’an was in fact a pagan Arab “Moon-god” from pre-Islamic times. The seeds of this argument were sown by the work of the Danish scholar Ditlef Nielsen, who divided the Semitic deities into a triad of Father-Moon, Mother-Sun and Son-Venus.[1] His ideas (esp., triadic hypothesis) were used uncritically by later scholars who came to excavate many sites in the Near East and consequently assigned astral significance to the deities that they had found. Since 1991 Ditlef Nielsen’s views were given a new and unexpected twist by the Christian polemicist Robert Morey. In a series of pamphlets, books and radio programs, he claimed that “Allah” of the Qur’an was nothing but the pagan Arab “Moon-god”. To support his views, he presented evidences from the Near East which can be seen in “Appendix C: The Moon God and Archeology” from his book The Islamic Invasion: Confronting The World’s Fastest-Growing Religion and it was subsequently reprinted with minor changes as a booklet called The Moon-God Allah In The Archeology Of The Middle East.[2] It can justifiably be said that this book lies at the heart of missionary propaganda against Islam today. The popularity of Morey’s ideas was given a new breath of life by another Christian polemicist Jack T. Chick, who drew a fictionalised racially stereotyped story entitled “Allah Had No Son”.

Morey’s ideas have gained widespread popularity among amenable Christians, and, more often than not, Muslims find themselves challenged to refute the ‘archaeological’ evidence presented by Morey. Surprisingly, it has also been suggested by some Christians that Morey has conducted “groundbreaking research on the pre-Islamic origins of Islam.” In this article, we would like to examine the two most prominent evidences postulated by Morey, namely the archaeological site in Hazor, Palestine and the Arabian “Moon temple” at Hureidha in Hadhramaut, Yemen, along with the diagrams presented in Appendix C of his book The Islamic Invasion: Confronting The World’s Fastest-Growing Religion (and booklet The Moon-God Allah In The Archeology Of The Middle East) all of which he uses to claim that Allah of the Qur’an was a pagan “Moon-god”.[3]

2. The Statue At Hazor: “Allah” Of The Muslims?

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